Web design

How To Become Greater Web Designer?

Are you looking for ways to improve your web design skills? We’ve compiled a list of 13 pointers to assist you in your creative development.

You can constantly improve your craft as a website designer, whether you’re just starting out or have developed dozens of websites.

Here are 13 pointers to assist you to improve your design skills and work.

1. Stay away from busy color palettes.

It’s easy to go crazy with color when there are so many great tints and hues available. Despite the fact that bright and aggressive color schemes are a staple of many designers’ tastes, when too many colors are used too close together, the visual cacophony created overwhelms the rest of the web design.

Stick to a simple color scheme with a neutral background. Colors on call-to-action buttons, menu items, and other design components stand out against a neutral background, ensuring that they get the attention they deserve. A simple white, black, or neutral background is sometimes all you need.

This website for hairstylist Emi Styles, created in Webflow, is an excellent example of how a simple color scheme can convey a sense of tranquility and order. Read up on color theory to better understand how to use color in your own web design. It will help you make better decisions about your own color schemes.

2. Think about the photographs you’re going to use.

The photographs used in a web design layout have a significant impact on the overall appearance and feel of a website. Even the most brilliant ideas can be ruined by poorly shot photographs with fuzzily focused focus and a shaky composition. Generic stock photographs can deplete a design’s life, leaving it flat and unappealing.

Adding high-quality photos to your designs is an easy way to improve them.

If you wish to use stock photos, there are plenty of wonderful possibilities available. However, don’t just drop them into your designs as is. Make sure they’re cropped and edited. To make the photographs better blend in with the harmony of a web design, add filters, modify the saturation, change the warmth, increase the contrast, and employ other photo editing techniques.

Also, make sure that the images you chose are appropriate for the content with which they’ll be used. If a photo doesn’t seem to belong in the part it’s being placed in, you may need to replace it with one that does.

Last but not least, pay attention to the file formats you’re working with. Understand the distinction between a JPG and a PNG. The right file types can make a big difference in how quickly your pages load.

3. Become familiar with SEO.

We understand that you didn’t get into web design to be troubled by search engine optimization. However, the way you put a website together can have a big impact on SEO.

A few things you should know about search engine optimization as a web designer include:

How to use h1>, h2>, and h3> header tags correctly

How the slug — the element of a link that identifies a specific page — affects organic search results

How to optimize pictures for faster loading times and a lower bounce rate – the percentage of visitors who only look at one page on your site before leaving without taking any action.

Of course, the complexities of SEO can’t be reduced to three bullet points. Please see our blog post “9 SEO best practices for your Webflow website” for a great introduction to search engine optimization.

4. Make your website responsive.

There are a variety of devices available, each with a different screen size. No matter how someone accesses your site design, it should provide a consistent experience no matter what device they’re using. Instead than wasting time on unnecessarily sophisticated animations and hover effects that may or may not function on all devices, spend that time improving the UI and UX for everyone.

Your website will be user-friendly and deliver an optimum experience across desktop and mobile devices if you follow the principles of responsive design.

Check out our “Intro to Responsive Design” course material to learn more about how to make your own designs more accessible.

5. Maintain a consistent typography

When we sit down to read a book, we anticipate every page to be in chronological order. The text will be the same size, with the same precise spacing and repeating format. This sense of coherence keeps us interested, allowing us to read uninterruptedly through the pages of a book.

In the same way, the typography in a web design needs to be orderly and consistent. From one page of a website to the next, headers, body text, links, and other information must be styled in the same way. Padding, line spacing, size, color, and weight should all be consistent for each form of content.

Setting up a universal style guide page for each website you develop is something we recommend. You may ensure that typography is consistent throughout a site design by doing so.

Webflow’s style manager, for example, is a useful tool for managing text styles like headers and body copy, making it simple to keep track of all the text styles you’ve set up.

6. Be mindful of diversity and inclusion.

A wide range of backgrounds, ethnicities, genders, skills, and ages are represented on a home page. Being a good web designer entails providing a pleasant user experience for all. Make sure that the pictures and character images you choose depict people from many walks of life.

We’ve previously lauded Pablo Stanley’s free character illustration generator Humaaans. It’s a simple method to include a diverse group of individuals in your design.

7. Identify yourself as a designer.

Designers frequently have numerous skill sets that include UI, UX, and other parts of web development. When working on projects, a web designer rarely has a singular emphasis.

However, because there are so many diverse aspects to design, mastering them all is an impossible task. It’s critical for designers to pursue parts of design that excite and intrigue them personally. Good designers understand that specializing in one area and being an expert in that area distinguishes their work and makes them more appealing to potential clients.

Though many designers find themselves jumping from one type of project to the next early in their careers, identifying a speciality becomes simpler with time, maturity, and contemplation.

To begin, determine which types of businesses or clientele make you the happiest. If you’re interested in all things IT, look for SaaS companies, startups, and other digital entities. If you enjoy cooking, you could discover that building restaurant websites is a good fit for you.

Your artistic aesthetic is also a part of defining oneself as a designer. Whether you prefer meticulously created minimalist designs or prefer to push the boundaries with abstract and conceptual design, make sure you have a distinct design voice.

Knowing who you are as a designer makes it easier to locate projects and individuals with whom you want to collaborate. It also allows you to create a targeted LinkedIn profile and portfolio, allowing potential clients to quickly recognize your skills.

8. Be a designer’s mentor

Being a mentor isn’t just a great way to give back and aid out a young designer; it can also help you improve your own design critique.

Mentoring is more than just providing website design advice. It entails being able to assess an issue and explain why it isn’t working, as well as the steps that can be taken to change it. It will be easier for you to analyze your own designs if you pay attention to someone else’s work and exercise the analytical section of your brain.

9. Develop case studies

Case studies should be included in every web designer’s portfolio website, yet many fail to do so. Case studies can aid you in a variety of ways, despite the fact that they take some time and work.

Case studies are quite beneficial to a portfolio. Visitors to your website get a closer look at your process, learn how you solve problems, and have a better sense of who you are as a designer.

Taking a more detailed look at your work as a web designer can also help you understand what you’re doing well and where you might improve. Case studies serve as a detailed record of your development and serve as a detailed archive of your work.

10. Be aware of the fundamentals of web design.

Wikimedia Commons is the source of this image.

Knowing the principles of design gives competent designers the intuition that guides their decision-making.

Take the time to study about the principles of user interface design, user experience design, typography, composition, and color theory. Understand visual hierarchy, Gestalt theory fundamentals, and the golden ratio. Explore the more intellectual components of design so you may apply what you’ve learned to your own work.

Check out this piece we wrote on 10 effective web design principles every designer should know if you’re looking for a good place to start.

11. Request more constructive criticism and feedback on your work.

It feels good to be told what you’re doing well. However, constructive criticism is required to advance as a web designer.

It all starts with you getting the correct feedback.

Make it clear what kind of input you’d like. Give them some background information on the project and its objectives. Prepare all of the information they’ll need to evaluate your effort.

You could ask the folks who are assessing your site designs the following questions:

  • Is it possible to reorganize the content to make it more readable?
  • Is the UI functionality intuitive?
  • Is the visual hierarchy effective?
  • What can be done to make things more usable?
  • Is there anything crucial missing from the page?
  • Do the rules for responsive web design apply to this website?
  • Will this website be able to hold the attention of its visitors?

And, of course, don’t rely solely on designer criticism. Marketers, content writers, and even friends and family are excellent sources of input.

12. Continue to be inspired

It’s easy to get caught up in the void of one’s work and get into a design rut. Keep your mind active with site designs that inspire you to avoid creative stagnation.

Check out Awwwards, Behance, Dribbble, and the Webflow Showcase to see what’s new. Follow your favorite web designers on social media and take in as much as you can about their work.

The Webflow Showcase features numerous exceptional designs, like AOline bags, a fancy handbag concept website.

13. Work on web design initiatives that are experimental.

Why not come up with something unusual? Make an effort to create something unusual or unusual. Take an existing website and create your own boundary-pushing overhaul for it. Going outside of your comfort zone forces you to approach your design job differently, as any excellent designer understands.

Also, don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Uncharted design territory doesn’t always result in a design you’ll like. The beautiful thing about these kinds of personal initiatives is that no one needs to know if you fail.

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